Skateboarding:
Introducing: Logsaw Meat

Logsaw Meat is a Slovenian based company that recycles used skateboards, transforming them into mini cruisers. Customers can return their old board in exchange for store credit and offering skateboards to begin with ensures that no old deck goes to waste. It’s an interesting initiative and certainly a positive one, although the man behind the company – Nejc Vašl – would be keen to dispel any myths of hippy bullshit.

In a country with virtually no skate market, Logsaw Meat is a bold move. Initially set up as a joke, it quickly evolved into something more serious. However, the company still retains that tongue-in-cheek humour with their press release claiming that their boards are designed for ‘violence or getting around – either way, it’s all good fun’.

Intrigued to find out more, we caught up with the man behind the brand to see what he had to say:

For those that don’t know could you please introduce yourself?

My name is Nejc, I’m not old and currently live in a small flat that overlooks the presidential palace and a park with an angry person statue in the middle. I have a cat. I only wear one pair of pants. Last week a car hit me and I flew over the hood. My greatest dream is to have an army of ex lovers following me, no matter how badly I treated them. I did study architecture, but that did not render itself to be very profitable. Not like I started this thing that we are having this interview about, because I wanted to make money of of it, but I did have a lot of time on my hands to do … something.

What is Logsaw Meat and how did it start?

It is a project slash brand slash online skate shop that tries to be something super special. We reshape old skateboards into mini cruisers. We sell skateboards also, so we try to create a closed loop of circling material, that doesn’t have to ever be thrown away. To lure people into it, we offer store credit in exchange for old boards.

Like I said, it started from having too much time and some fucking around in the workshop.

So what’s the actual process for recycling an old board and transforming it into a new cruiser?

It is like with Frodo and the ring, which he had to carry to Mordor. At first it he was a happy and young little Hobbit. Then he received the ring and subsequently a task to carry it to its destruction. During his journey he was battered with all sorts of trials and abuse, but he made it through and finished the task, destroyed the ring and made good friends along the way, plus a good story to tell. Overall I think it was a good experience for him.

About the process of recycling an old board. We get a board, we examine it and if it is cracked, we have a good reason to fight, which is always a good thing. If it is not, we sketch a new shape on top of it and after a couple of hours it’s ready for print. When we have enough boards to call it a collection, we head over to the screen-printing facility which is actually a school for troubled kids and where everybody is super nice. This is where we, yeah, print. And that’s it. We finish it off with some beauty make-up, and it’s ready to go. Haha, that reminds me of “I hate to see you leave, but love to see you go” from QOTSA.

I also wanted to know, do you just make cruisers and if so why?

Yes, besides just selling other skate related stuff we actually make only cruisers. Ok we are gonna print skateboards on our own, but that doesn’t count. Well, we don’t actually make other stuff cause we don’t have the knowledge or resources to out-perform already established manufacturers.

How many people are involved?

There’s me, there’s someone that helps me with design, there’s one that helps me shape, there’s someone that helps me print and one that helps me promote. So you can say we are a few.

What was the motivation behind starting a company like this?

I guess I kinda wanted to make something on my own. You know, like that saying, it doesn’t matter if it’s ugly, it’s yours? Something like that. Beside that, a couple of years ago I read an article about sustainable urban development and how every city is promoting itself to be all about it. The author made a nice joke about it, it is the same with sex in middle school, a lot of people are saying they are doing it, but those who are, are doing it wrong, and others are probably lying. I did not take it seriously, but later found that he was exactly right. So I try to make something … hm, positive in this respect? But just talking about it makes me feel uncomfortable, since this “sustainability and recycling” has such a lame overtone. It would be great if this Logsaw Meat project wouldn’t fit in this bin of other hippie bullshit and just be something that would someday look great and still have the right attitude towards contemporary issues.

No just kidding. The motivation was money.

Haha, I think actually it’s already this sort of project.

Thank you.

What’s the skate scene like in Slovenia?

I don’t think I am the right one to pass judgment on this but it’s the worst. With an exception of ROW guys, I don’t think you can call what is going on here “a scene”. There are just a couple of douchebags that support energy drinks and still live in the nineties and honestly do nothing but hold back the process of society’s organic development haha.

Are energy drink companies as involved in the skate scene over there as here in the UK?

They are involved in sponsoring a couple of events that are going on here and a couple of the most known riders, so I guess they are. I wouldn’t touch them but then again China’s least paid workers wouldn’t touch those exploitive jobs if they had other options.

What are your plans for the future?

In the words of small, but great David Gonzales, to be a rockstar!

http://logsawmeat.com/

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